Jun 10, 2016

The New York Times says the space weapons ban resolution that passed in Richmond last year — and which some local officials called an embarrassment to the city, partly due to its negative impacts on the mentally ill and their families — was perhaps the biggest victory of the year for the targeted individuals community.

The article states: “Perhaps their biggest victory came last year, when believers in Richmond, Calif., persuaded the City Council to pass a resolution banning space-based weapons that they believe could be used for mind control. A similar lobbying effort is underway in Tucson.”

Targeted individuals are part of an organized group who believe they are being harassed and sickened by space-based weaponry or being trailed by stalkers, with their enemies possibly being the government or other sinister sources in power. Some believe they are being poisoned by chemtrails, which are toxins sprayed onto populations by aircraft.

The targeted population turned its attention to the city of Richmond when members of the Richmond Progressive Alliance (RPA) on council successfully pushed for a resolution to ban space weaponry in order to appease at least one local resident claiming to be afflicted.

The resolution led to an inundation of calls to the Richmond Police Department from targeted individuals from around the world. In a statement, then-Police Chief Chris Magnus said the department lacked the resources to field so many calls.

Councilman Jael Myrick later expressed regret for voting in favor of the resolution, calling it an “embarrassment” to the city, as Richmond’s council was ridiculed in the media and on talk shows.  The resolution, critics added, recklessly validated fears among paranoid citizens, which negatively impacted their loved ones.

Distressed targeted individuals wrote letters to Richmond Mayor Tom Butt and even President Obama following the Richmond resolution.

Now it appears Magnus could have to deal with another large influx of phone calls. He recently left the Richmond Police Department to become police chief in Tucson.


  1. The New York Times article is not speaking positively at all about the space weapons ban given that the article is about paranoia and mental illness.

    “For the few specialists who have looked closely, these individuals represent an alarming development in the history of mental illness: thousands of sick people, banded together and demanding recognition on the basis of shared paranoias.

    They raise money, hold awareness campaigns, host international conferences and fight for their causes in courts and legislatures.”

    KM | Jun 10th, 2016
  2. The article is about paranoia and mental illness. This victory should not be portrayed in a positive light

    KM | Jun 10th, 2016
  3. Even with this legislation I still wear my tin foil hat on odd numbered days when the sun is out before 11am.

    AI | Jun 11th, 2016
  4. I hope they pass a resolution to prevent people from harassing Bigfoot. We should all get together and demand that the RPA address real concerns about Bigfoot, and racist/sexist/homophobic/bigoted actions that may be perpetrated against Bigfoot, as well as Count Chocula.

    bill | Jun 13th, 2016
  5. You probably wouldn’t understand until it happens to you or someone you love. My life is not my own, it is directed by unseen influences. Count your sanity as a blessing, but don’t be so dismissive.

    Nobody | Jul 25th, 2016
  6. You could’t understand until it happens to you or someone you love. These influences are not my own, and their non-consensual. Value your cognition while it still goes unaltered. Put it to better use then dismissing a number of our populace you don’t understand.

    Brandon | Jul 25th, 2016
  7. Hello😀. I don’t think it’s an embarrassment at all. The facts are that the targets are threatened, harassed, and assaulted, and extorted from. If you guys think DT has a sexual assault problem, he has nothing on this stuff.

    Brian Bernick | Oct 23rd, 2016

About the Author

Mike Aldax is the editor of the Richmond Standard. He has 13 years of journalism experience, most recently as a reporter for the San Francisco Examiner. He previously held roles as reporter and editor at Bay City News, Napa Valley Register, Garden Island Newspaper in Kaua’i, and the Queens Courier in New York City.