Jun 1, 2016
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The famous Guinness World Record-breaking Rosie Rally in Richmond has led to awards for multiple movers and shakers in the city, including Beth Javens (pictured on left), the executive director of the Richmond Convention and Visitors Bureau (CVB).

Javens is pictured alongside one of Richmond’s living icons, Betty Reid Soskin, the famous National Park Service ranger who continues to tell visitors stories about Richmond’s rich history.

On May 25 in Richmond City Council Chambers, Javens and CVB joined the city, Rosie the Riveter Trust, The Spirit of ’45, and The Rosie the Riveter/WWII/Home Front National Historical Park in receiving a Richmond Historic Preservation Commission award.

The award stems from the collaborative effort to sponsor and plan the Aug. 14, 2015 Rosie Rally — which brought together 1,084 girls and women dressed as the WWII Rosie icon in Richmond.

The feat not only broke a Guinness World Record for gatherings of Rosie lookalikes at one location, it succeeded in spreading the message about the many things to see along Richmond’s historic waterfront.

Check out drone footage of the August 2015 Rosie Rally courtesy of Radio Free Richmond.

The feat also managed to launch a friendly and well-publicized rivalry with folks in Michigan.

The Guinness World record for Rosie gatherings was first set at the Willow Run Airport in Ypsilanti, MI in March 2014. After the Richmond contingent broke that record in August last year, the folks in Michigan recently stole back the record by gathering more than 2,000 lookalikes at Willow Run, the former WWII bomber plant.

Not to be outdone, the Richmond contingent is planning to steal back the record by amassing up to 5,000 Rosie lookalikes. The record attempt will take place Saturday, Aug. 13, in conjunction with the Homefront Festival at the Craneway Pavilion.

The Rosie Rallies continue to shine a light on WWII stories and the many options to revisit the past in Richmond.

It's official! Richmond holds Guinness World Record at 1,084 Rosies

“Richmond is poised for the present and a big part of that effort lies in the unique history of our city,” Javens said in a statement. “Historic preservation and a celebration of our heritage are pillars of our efforts to promote Richmond as a unique tourism destination.”

Javens touted a bright future for Richmond’s historic waterfront with the public parks, the historic Rosie the Riveter /WWII Home Front National Historical Park, 32 miles of waterfront (more than any other locality in the region), the Richmond Bay Trail and the long-awaited ferry connecting Richmond to San Francisco by 2018.

“All of these are part and parcel of what is causing people, especially Bay Area locals looking for weekend getaways, to take a look at Richmond,” Javens said.

For more information on the next Rosie Rally, visit rosietheriveter.org.



About the Author

Mike Aldax is the editor of the Richmond Standard. He has 13 years of journalism experience, most recently as a reporter for the San Francisco Examiner. He previously held roles as reporter and editor at Bay City News, Napa Valley Register, Garden Island Newspaper in Kaua’i, and the Queens Courier in New York City.