Feb 4, 2016

A road rage incident preceded the Richmond collision that killed 77-year-old Anthony Tonti (pictured above) last week, police said.

Before the fatal crash that occurred just after midnight Friday at the intersection of Solano Avenue and Ventura Street, 32-year-old Richmond resident Obed Obesso had been involved in a road rage incident during which he had chased a car (not Tonti’s) from the freeway onto city streets. When he reached the intersection of Solano and Ventura, he failed to stop at a stop sign while speeding and crashed into the driver’s side of Tonti’s car, a Ford Fusion, causing a three-car crash, Richmond police Lt. Felix Tan said.

Richmond police announce arrest in fatal hit-and-run at Ventura and Solano

Tonti was found unresponsive and trapped inside his vehicle. He was pronounced dead shortly thereafter, Tan said.

Obesso (pictured above) fled the scene on foot before police arrived, leaving his Ford Ranger behind at the crash scene. After an investigation, police arrested Obesso five days later and he confessed to the crime, Tan said.

On Wednesday, he was formally charged by the Contra Costa County District Attorney’s Office with vehicular manslaughter and felony hit-and-run, police said.

“We hope that this arrest brings some closure to Anthony Tonti’s family,” Tan said.


  1. Anthony Tonti is my uncle and I just want to thank RDP for their work. Nothing will bring him back, but at least the person responsible for his tragic death will held accountable. Thank you.

    Stephanie | Feb 4th, 2016
  2. A wake up call to other “road ragers”? I doubt it. One life gone, Another life thoroughly messed up and the lives of survivors on both sides tragically impacted.

    Maurice Abraham | Feb 4th, 2016

About the Author

Mike Aldax is the editor of the Richmond Standard. He has 13 years of journalism experience, most recently as a reporter for the San Francisco Examiner. He previously held roles as reporter and editor at Bay City News, Napa Valley Register, Garden Island Newspaper in Kaua’i, and the Queens Courier in New York City.