Jan 25, 2016
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Officials with the city of Richmond, Chevron and West Contra Costa Unified are set to gather at Kennedy High on Tuesday to officially launch the $35 million Richmond Promise Scholarship Program, which will provide high school students living in Richmond and North Richmond with scholarships of up to $1,500 annually for college.

At 10 a.m. Tuesday in the John F. Kennedy High School Fab Lab at 4300 Cutting Blvd., local officials will help Richmond students get started in the application process for the program, which comes from a $90 million community benefits agreement with Chevron Richmond connected to the upcoming $1 billion modernization of the Richmond Refinery.

Richmond Mayor Tom Butt will be among those who will attend Tuesday’s launch and help Kennedy High seniors begin their applications, according to his office.

Scholarships are set to be awarded to members of the Class of 2016. Applications are due March 17. For information on how to apply, students can attend two community workshops, including on Wednesday, Jan. 27, from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. in Richmond City Council Chambers, 440 Civic Center Plaza. The second workshop will be held Feb. 11 in the DeJean Middle School Multipurpose Room at 3400 Macdonald Ave.

In November, following a lengthy community vetting process that included recommendations from an ad-hoc committee of local stakeholders, Richmond City Council voted to set the award amount at up to $1,500 annually per student toward attending either a community college or four-year college or university. It also voted to include residents attending charter and private schools in the program, as long as the schools are located within the WCCUSD catchment area.

Students in community college can continue to receive funding beyond two years only if they continue their education at a four-year school.

Also at Tuesday’s launch, the new executive director of the non-profit organization created to manage the Richmond Promise program will be introduced. One of the major duties of that role will be to identify additional funding to keep the program going beyond the initial $35 million investment.



About the Author

Mike Aldax is the editor of the Richmond Standard. He has 13 years of journalism experience, most recently as a reporter for the San Francisco Examiner. He previously held roles as reporter and editor at Bay City News, Napa Valley Register, Garden Island Newspaper in Kaua’i, and the Queens Courier in New York City.