Dec 15, 2015
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City officials working on the Nevin Avenue Improvement Project are asking community members not to dump their trash at the worksite, which is illegal.

Two photos showing examples of illegal dumping were posted Monday on a Facebook page dedicated to providing updates about the project.

“This is a construction site, not a dumping yard,” the post stated. “Please treat your community with care and respect. Violators will be fined if caught.”

Construction began in August on the first phase of the Nevin Avenue Improvement Project, which aims to create a safe and more scenic route for bicyclists, pedestrians and drivers between BART station and Civic Center Plaza. The first phase is impacting Nevin between 19th and 27th streets. The construction has caused street closures and reduced parking options.

On Thursday, the city is set to hold a community meeting to provide an update on ongoing project delays. Three unforeseen utility conflicts have hampered construction, and the city says it is working with PG&E, the East Bay Municipal Utility District and other agencies to resolve the issues.

“In addition to solving these conflicts, we have also changed the staging of work to allow for some of Nevin Avenue to be completed as soon as possible, to relieve some parking issues and expedite completion of the project,” the city said in a statement. “During the next few weeks you will see construction crews completing the storm drain work, followed by reconstruction of the sidewalks, and then paving. Once the roadway is paved back, parking on Nevin Avenue will be allowed.”

Wednesday’s community meeting will be held at 450 Civic Center Plaza — the Richmond Room — at 6 p.m. sharp.

The plans for the eight blocks between 19th and 27th, made possible with mostly federal funds, includes wider sidewalks, bicycle lanes, 100 trees and other landscaping, a traffic circle, crosswalks with pedestrian flashers and improved lighting for nighttime travel.


About the Author

Mike Aldax is the editor of the Richmond Standard. He has 13 years of journalism experience, most recently as a reporter for the San Francisco Examiner. He previously held roles as reporter and editor at Bay City News, Napa Valley Register, Garden Island Newspaper in Kaua’i, and the Queens Courier in New York City.