Oct 15, 2015
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In response to concerns from neighbors, city staff is proposing to install new stop signs at dozens of Richmond locations, including turning 28 intersections into four-way stops.

On Tuesday, Richmond City Council is scheduled to vote on whether to adopt a resolution to use funds from the Public Works operating budget to slow traffic around residential areas.

Substantial complaints about speeding have been reported on Moyers Road, Amend Road and South 37th Street, according to city documents.

“Speeding vehicles have caused accidents and raise roadway safety concerns,” city staff said.

After researching traffic volume, speeds, accident reports and other data, the city made recommendations for changes that have been approved by Public Works Director Yader Bermudez and Richmond police Lt. Joey Schlemmer.

The proposal includes adding stop signs at 28 intersections so that they will become four-way stops. These locations include (click to enlarge list):


Additionally, new stop signs are recommended at these intersections (click to enlarge list):

stop.10-15If council approves the recommendations, police would closely monitor the locations where changes occur, staff said.

The measures would ease concerns of dozens of residents. Last summer, multiple car pileups were reported on South 37th between Wall and Cutting due to speeding drivers losing control. The request for a 4-way stop on South 39th at Center Avenue stemmed from concern about the nearby elementary school.

Also last summer, a petition signed by 53 residents called for speed controls on Amend Road, where they said steep grades and curves have inspired dangerous conditions for decades.

Read some of the notices sent to city staff requesting traffic control measures here.


About the Author

Mike Aldax is the editor of the Richmond Standard. He has 13 years of journalism experience, most recently as a reporter for the San Francisco Examiner. He previously held roles as reporter and editor at Bay City News, Napa Valley Register, Garden Island Newspaper in Kaua’i, and the Queens Courier in New York City.