Jan 8, 2015
1 comment

Construction is slated to start in March on a $2.7 million project to improve the area outside BART’s Richmond Station for the benefit of pedestrians, cars and buses.

On Thursday, the BART Board of Directors approved the contract intended to modernize the existing lot on the west side of the station, where riders are dropped off, picked up or where they catch the bus.

The improvements, funded with federal, state, county and BART sources,  consist of better lighting, drought-resistant landscaping and more visible pedestrian paths, including a ramp specifically designed for the physically impaired. There will also be a new drop off and pick up lane, a new designated taxi area and a bus location with electronic displays on shelters showing real-time departures.

That’s not all the improvements in the works near the station. Separate from the BART project, the City of Richmond is working on its own $7.7 million plan to rehabilitate an eight-block pathway between Civic Center and BART station along Nevin Avenue.

Improvements along Nevin could break ground as soon as March or April, depending on progress in the bidding process, Chad Smalley, a project manager with the city, said Thursday. The project would include, among other amenities, eight blocks along Nevin with wider sidewalks, new trees, crosswalks with pedestrian flashers and improved lighting for nighttime travel.

“As the City of Richmond continues to strive to renovate its downtown, having a transit center that fits into the vision for the area and provides a sense of safety is essential,” said BART Director Zakhary Mallett in a statement.


  1. Didn’t BART redo the same just a few years ago in prep for their new parking garage?

    Mike | Jan 9th, 2015

About the Author

Mike Aldax is the editor of the Richmond Standard. He has 13 years of journalism experience, most recently as a reporter for the San Francisco Examiner. He previously held roles as reporter and editor at Bay City News, Napa Valley Register, Garden Island Newspaper in Kaua’i, and the Queens Courier in New York City.