Richmond Art Center to open fall exhibitions with world renowned artist, expanded hours

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The Richmond Art Center's fall programs include an exhibit of the works of world famous artist Richard Diebenkorn and extended hours to view the artwork.
The image above is only a part of world renowned artist Richard Diebenkorn's piece, "Untitled," drawn from charcoal and ink in 1964. An image of the full piece is below.

The Richmond Art Center’s highly-anticipated fall programs include an exhibit of the works of world famous artist Richard Diebenkorn and extended hours to view the artwork.

Fall’s main exhibition, Closely Considered – Diebenkorn in Berkeley, showcases works by artists from the Bay Area Figurative Movement, which includes Diebenkorn, David Park, Elmer Bischoff, Nathan Oliveira, James Weeks and Joan Brown.

Other exhibitions will feature works by other Bay Area artists such as prints by Frank Lobdell, large-scale paintings by Tom Holland and the printmaking practices and collections of Juan Fuentes, Art Hazelwood, Jos Sances and Jim Nikas.

The free opening reception for the exhibits is scheduled to take place Saturday from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Art Center, located at 2540 Barrett Ave. in Richmond. The fall exhibitions run from Sept. 14 through Nov. 16.

artcenter.9-11Residents now have more opportunities to view the work. The Art Center recently expanded its gallery hours to Tuesdays through Saturdays  from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sundays from noon to 5 p.m. The galleries are free.

“We’re thrilled to bring back the work of Richard Diebenkorn, one of the most influential painters of the last 50 years,” Richard Ambrose, executive director for the Richmond Art Center, said in a statement. “He exhibited his work at the Art Center in the 1950s and held his first major exhibition of drawings here in 1968.”

The Art Center, which is nearing its 80-year anniversary, also recently launched a new logo, and a revamped website aimed at reaching Spanish-speakers.

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Frank Lobdell created this lithograph during a fellowship at the Tamarind Lithography Workshop in Los Angeles in 1966.

Here’s info about the exhibitions:

Closely Considered – Diebenkorn in Berkeley
(September 14 – November 22, 2014)
Richard Diebenkorn, who spent most of his life in California, exhibited at the Art Center in the 1950s and held his first major exhibition of drawings here in 1968. This exhibition features more than 42 intimate works by Richard Diebenkorn and key artists of the Bay Area Figurative Movement — including David Park, Elmer Bischoff, Frank Lobdell, Nathan Oliveira, James Weeks and Joan Brown. This exhibition will be complemented by a series of free programs.

Luminous Space: Paintings by Tom Holland
(September 14 – November 22, 2014)
Features abstract metal work by Bay Area artist Tom Holland who merges sculpture and painting to create freestanding sculptural forms and wall hangings. His unique style utilizes simple materials like fiberglass, aluminum and epoxy paint. Holland’s long-standing relationship with the Richmond Art Center began in the 1960s when he taught studio classes and his first solo exhibition was mounted at the Center in 1966.

Frank Lobdell: the Tamarind Prints
(September 14 – November 22, 2014)
Features a series of prints created by Bay Area artist Frank Lobdell during his fellowship at the Tamarind Lithography Workshop in Los Angeles in 1966. Known as one of the premier painters in the history of San Francisco Bay Area Abstract Expressionism and Bay Area Figurative Movement, Lobdell produced work that also included lithographs, etchings and monoprints. While at Tamarind, Lobdell produced a total of 33 prints, 32 of which he editioned and released, and developed his composition for a large painting Summer 1967 (In Memory of James Budd Dixon), which was recently acquired by the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco.

Social Discourses: In Print
(September 14 – November 22, 2014)
Features the printmaking practices and collections of Bay Area artists Juan Fuentes, Art Hazelwood, Jos Sances and Jim Nikas to illustrate how printmaking engages people in social issues and the sharing of ideas. The exhibition will address links between the practices and how printmaking has been used to create accessible political messages, social change and political solidarity.

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